ABSTRACT

In an imagined continuum of “transition” Serbia is both an extreme and an exception. It is an exception because it was a part of ex-Yugosla­ via, which itself was an exception in many ways, because “transition” there is connected to the wars in which the Serbian regime had a deci­ sive role, and because it was an object of NATO intervention. It is an extreme in the sense of the level of destruction of institutions, of mak­ ing institutional blockades, of sacrificing its own and other nations’ citizens, i.e., the total price that, in the case of Serbia, one “perverted” transition means. (Blagojevic, 2000a, p. 35)

To deal with sexuality in Serbia is, as with dealing with anything else, a multilayered and very difficult task. From the very beginning one encoun­ ters a lack of contemporary literature in the Serbian language, followed by a lack of any systematic gathering of information on sexuality-related issues.1