ABSTRACT

The changes Skelton made, in the second decade of the sixteenth century, to the use of transgressive language in drama were prompted by his concern with cultural change. The religious tensions of the 1530s were a far more dangerous topic for a playwright to address. This danger appears to govern the changes and innovations John Heywood made to transgressive language, and his use of fragmented allegory, in his Play of the Wether.