ABSTRACT

If we take a moment to consider the ways in which we may respond to new information, we will find that there are three basic possibilities. First, the new information may be accepted, albeit with varying possible degrees of enthusiasm. Or, the new information may be ignored, either due to a lack of interest or to an unawareness of its relevance. Third, the new information may be rejected, e.g., through derogation or dismissal. It is to the latter two reactions that we apply the term resistance. Although the number of specific ways in which we may resist changing our beliefs is nearly infinite, some general recurring tendencies have been discovered by psychologists. This book explores some of the most common ways in which these tendencies are enacted.