ABSTRACT

By psycheJung understands not merely what we usuallymean by the word 'soul' (Seele) or 'mind' but 'thetotality of all psychological processes, both conscious as well as unconscious' I-that is, something broader than and including the soul, which for him constitutes only a certain 'limited complex of functions.' 2 The psyche consists

THE NATURE AND STRUCTURE OF THE PSYCJ-IE

THE NATURE AND STRUCTURE OF THE PSYCHE

subliminally perceived, thought, and felt matter of every kind.'! This region lung calls the 'PERSONAL UNCONSCIOUS' in order to distinguish it from that of the 'COLLECTIVE UNCONSCIOUS', as is indicated in Diagram 111. 1 For the collective part of the unconscious no longer includes

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· of its momentary contents.' 1 The decisive fact is, accordingly, not what one thinks, but that one employs one's intellectual 'function and not, for in'stance, one's intuition in receiving and working up contents presented from without or within. 2 Thinking is that function which seeks to reach aa understanding of the world and an adjustment to it by means of an act of thought, of cognition-Le., of conceptual relations and logical deductions. In contrast thereto the feeling function apprehends the world on the basis of an evaluation by means of the concepts, 'pleasant or unpleasant, adience or avoidance'. Both functions are characterized as rational because they work with values:

thinking evaluates 'by means of cognitions from the viewpoint 'true-false', feeling by means of emotions from the viewpoint 'agreeable-disagreeable' . These two fundamental forms of reactions are mutually exclusive as practical determinants of behaviour; the one or the other predominates.