ABSTRACT

63Perhaps nowhere was there more applicability of the once popular Jimmy Durante song “Have You Ever Had the Feeling That You Wanted to Go and Still Had the Feeling That You Wanted to Stay?” than in the case of the acquisition by the United States of non-contiguous territories. Given America’s unique and long-standing anti-colonial heritage dramatized in its own revolutionary national birth, the obvious paradox of itself becoming the colonial master of overseas possessions need not be belabored. Not only the original national debates that preceded the seizure of Hawaii, the Philippines and Puerto Rico but also the continuing agonies of national guilt once these alien lands were incorporated under the American flag clearly contributed to the heritage of both conscious and subconscious anti-colonialism which has plagued both the American government and its citizens in their attitudes toward control over non-contiguous lands and peoples.