ABSTRACT

By 1995, Matichon was a major newspaper with a daily circulation of 120,000, making it Thailand’s fourth best-selling newspaper (after Thai Rath with 600700,000, Daily News with 300-400,000, and Khao Sot with 160,000; sales were perhaps 40 per cent higher on the twice-monthly lottery results days). From the eight black-and-white pages of the early days, the paper had now expanded to thirty-two or forty pages. Whereas Matichon had traditionally concentrated on politics, giving over virtually its entire front page to political stories, its coverage had now broadened to encompass more economic and business news, as well as crime stories and ‘soft news’. While Matichon editors insisted that the news covered in the paper was not ‘sensational’ (unlike the gory car crash and murder photographs which typified the front pages of top-selling papers), the distinction between sensational and non-sensational crime stories was not always easy to detect.