ABSTRACT

A business is generally concerned with obtaining or creating only knowledge demonstrably useful in performing the work for which the particular business exists. In seeking such knowledge, a business is extremely pragmatic, just as ready to accept folk knowledge as scholarly knowledge. It is as interested in acquiring the noncognitive, or experiential, knowledge as knowledge derived from systematic or scientific inquiry. It is, in a word, eclectic in its approach and, to the casual observer, may even appear uncritical or, in some cases, unappreciative of the elegance of exact explanation and the beauty of succinct descriptions of orderliness—most especially when these are expressed in mathematical terms.