ABSTRACT

Price control and related commercial issues have been among the most controversial national political issues in Ghana. Debates and accusations concerning price control enforcement and the acceptable or actual role of traders have been used to justify the rise and fall of national governments. Successive military and civilian governments in Ghana since independence have faced rising prices, especially of imports and manufactures, which critics attributed to their soft or corrupt tactics in price control. Each new government then legitimised itself with an initial episode of strict enforcement, which tapered off and gave rise to new accusations. Price control thus plays a particularly prominent role here in the processes of state formation and regime stabilization.