ABSTRACT

Demand from building control officials for structural calculations - even for very simple projects - means that today's architects must have a thorough understanding of everyday structural concepts.

Structures for Architects satisfies the need for a basic introduction to the structural problems encountered by the architect, surveyor and builder. This third edition reflects advances in recent techniques and refers to current Building Regulations and Codes of Practice.

Students of architecture, building and surveying at degree, diploma or professional (RIBA, RICS, CIOB) examination level will find this book a valuable course text. Professionals in these fields who must perform structural calculations to satisfy building control authorities will also find it a useful handbook.

chapter 1|7 pages

INTRODUCTION

STRUCTURES The essenceo f this book is to establisht he sizes of structurale lementsw ithin a o f stability, form and function are covered

chapter |10 pages

method

The unique approachN atureh as at arriving at structuralf orm and function has o f Nature is able to adapt of a tree, that branchw ill slowly adapta nd grow strongert o cope with the extra o f what the correct size should be. For the less experienced,i t is and it is sufficient

chapter 2|8 pages

BASIC STRUCTURAL

Forces The unit of force is the newton (N), nameda fter Isaac Newton who observed

chapter |4 pages

Wind

ifthe concretei s restrained,s hrinkages tressesw ill occur. o f bricks and concretei n oppositiont o

chapter 3|20 pages

Chapter3

SIMPLE BEAMS of beams due to bending. shear and deflection In the previous chapter, strength, stability and serviceabilityw ere discussedi n The structurale lementsw ithin a building also have

chapter 4|4 pages

BASIC STRUCTURAL THEORY RELATED

but generallyt hey canb e divided or truss types that are really an extensiono f a beam to carry loads using but with the disadvantageo f a deepers ection (Fig. 4.2). The reductioni n weight is achievedb y eliminating all the BMs. The general

chapter |6 pages

F3 F3 F3 F3 F3 F3 F3 F3 F3 F3 F3 F3

chapter 5|3 pages

BASIC STRUCTURAL THEORY RELATED

o r by buckling. Fat, short columnsw ill fail The latter failure is complex, but the first two T he column will either crusho r buckle depending

chapter 6|9 pages

Chapter6

of softwoods listed in various codesa nd regulationsw hich a nd compression,b ut someo f the softwoodsm ay not be easily up to the requiredq uality. This leavest he

chapter |20 pages

yyyy

chapter 7|23 pages

STRUCTURAL STEEL DESIGN

Structural steel Hot-rolled sections and 7.3 show three generationso f hot-rolled sections,t he rolled Up to the mid 1950s, the steel sectionsw ere basedo n the RS],

chapter 8|3 pages

BRICK AND BLOCK WALL DESIGN

of bricks and a smallerv ariety of blocks on the market. of mortars, which can be usedt o bond theseb ricks and In generalt he bricks and blocks can be divided into: (a) Clay bricks

chapter |16 pages

t2 t2 t2

and at this stagei t is only necessaryto appreciatet hat a wall can spane ither in or the vertical direction. Effective width

chapter 9|23 pages

REINFORCED CONCRETE BEAM DESIGN

In the chaptersc overingt imber and steel, the elastic methodo f structurald esign In this chaptera nd the one on masonry,t he limit state method The two methodsw ere discussedi n section 1.3, and it is advisablet o a nd also to section8 .5 on the structurald esigno f masonry.

chapter 10|3 pages

EUROCODES

In the chaptersc overingt imber, steel, brickwork andc oncrete,B ritish Standards The purposeo f this chapteri s to and to introduce the concept of