ABSTRACT

This impressive study of the life of William Pitt, Earl of Chatham, was first published in 1913 when it achieved instant recognition as a brilliant appraisal of Pitt's career. It is a book with many outstanding merits to commend it to students of eighteenth century English history.

Based on thorough and extensive researches, it traces Pitt's career from his election as a Member of Parliament for Old Sarum in 1735 and gives a well balanced account of his part in home and foriegn politics and colonial affairs during the next 30 years. The book contains many good maps and an excellent index, and a very valuable appendix gives a list of all Pitt's extant speeches, with references to where reports of them may be found.

These two substantial volumes are invaluable as a portrait of one of the most outstanding historical figures of the eighteenth century.

chapter XIV|34 pages

THE CROWNING MERCIES

chapter XV|23 pages

CAUSES OF PITT’S DECLINE

chapter XVI|16 pages

THE NEW REIGN, 1760–1761

chapter XVII|29 pages

PITT'S PEACE NEGOTIATIONS

chapter XVIII|23 pages

PITT'S DOWNFALL, 1761

chapter XIX|24 pages

PITT AND THE PEACE OF PARIS, 1762–1763

chapter XX|29 pages

PITT UNCONNECTED, 1763–1765

chapter XXI|29 pages

PITT AND THE TAXATION OF AMERICA, 1765–1766

chapter XXII|40 pages

CHATHAM'S MINISTRY, 1766–1768

chapter XXIII|34 pages

THE GREAT COMMONER IN THE LORDS, 1769–1771

chapter XXIV|32 pages

AUTUMN DAYS, 1772–1775

chapter XXV|21 pages

THE LAST STAGE, 1755–1778