ABSTRACT

Originally published in 1994, Multinationals in North America is the third title in the Investment in Canada Research Series, reissued in 2019. The book examines the policy choices and actions of the largest business corporations and the three national governments in North America (Canada, the United States, and Mexico) as they respond to the enormous changes in technology and trade policies that began in the early 1980s and have continued in the 1990s. Multinationals in North America focuses on multinational enterprises (MNEs) and nation states in the context of regional free trade (the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement, FTA, and the North American Free Trade Agreement, NAFTA), and technological change as the underlying technology paradigm shifts from mass production to flexible production. MNEs and nation states are actors faced by change and, at the same time, are agents of change. Contributors examine the strategic options and interactions of MNEs and nation states as they attempt to manage their activities in a globalized economy.

Preface  Multinationals in North America: An Introduction to the Issues  Part I: Theory  2. Multinationals and Governments Key Actors in the NAFTA  3. The Theory of Multinational Plant Location in a Regional Trading Area  4. The Theory of Multinational Plant Location: Agglomerations and Disagglomerations  5. A Theory Of Business Networks  6. An Evolutionary Perspective on the Nafta  Part II: Evidence  7. Multinationals and Foreign Direct Investment in North America  8. Who Does What After NAFTA? Location Strategies of U.S. Multinationals  9. Japanese Multinationals in North America  10. MNE Activity: Comparing the Nafta and the European Community  11. Intra-Firm Trade in North America and the European Community  12. Foreign Direct Investment In Mexico  13. Foreign Direct Investment in Canada  Part III: Policy  14. New Rules for International Investment  15. Regulating Multinational Enterprises in North America  16. Multinationals and North American Security  17. Multinationals and Competition Policy in North America  18. The NAFTA, Multinationals and Social Policy  Part IV: Lessons and New Directions  Rapporteurs' Comments  About the Contributors