ABSTRACT

This volume investigates the horror genre across national boundaries (including locations such as Africa, Turkey, and post-Soviet Russia) and different media forms, illustrating the ways that horror can be theorized through the circulation, reception, and production of transnational media texts. Perhaps more than any other genre, horror is characterized by its ability to be simultaneously aware of the local while able to permeate national boundaries, to function on both regional and international registers. The essays here explore political models and allegories, questions of cult or subcultural media and their distribution practices, the relationship between regional or cultural networks, and the legibility of international horror iconography across distinct media. The book underscores how a discussion of contemporary international horror is not only about genre but about how genre can inform theories of visual cultures and the increasing permeability of their borders.

chapter |14 pages

Introduction

part |2 pages

PART I Spectres of History

chapter 1|13 pages

Ghastly Transmissions: The Horror of Connectivity and the Transnational Flow of Fear

ByBRENDA S. GARDENOUR WALTER

chapter 2|14 pages

Desire for the Past: The Supernaturalization of Yatsuhaka-mura

ByCHIHO NAKAGAWA

chapter 3|23 pages

High Stakes: The Vampire and the Double in Russian Cinema

ByGREG DOLGOPOLOV

part |2 pages

PART II Trans(gressing) Genre and Media

chapter 4|17 pages

Dark Monarchs: Gothic Landscapes in Contemporary British Culture

BySTELLA HOCKENHULL

chapter 5|21 pages

European Horror Games: Little Red Riding Hood’s Zombie BBQ and the European Game Industry

ByKARA ANDERSEN, KARRA SHIMABUKURO

part |2 pages

PART III Genre, History, and Horror

part |2 pages

PART IV Biology and Bodies

part |2 pages

PART V Postcolonial Animals