ABSTRACT

The second edition of The Urban Design Reader draws together the very best of classic and contemporary writings to illuminate and expand the theory and practice of urban design. Nearly 50 generous selections include seminal contributions from Howard, Le Corbusier, Lynch, and Jacobs to more recent writings by Waldheim, Koolhaas, and Sorkin. Following the widespread success of the first edition of The Urban Design Reader, this updated edition continues to provide the most important historical material of the urban design field, but also introduces new topics and selections that address the myriad challenges facing designers today.

The six part structure of the second edition guides the reader through the history, theory and practice of urban design. The reader is initially introduced to those classic writings that provide the historical precedents for city-making into the twentieth century. Part Two introduces the voices and ideas that were instrumental in establishing the foundations of the urban design field from the late 1950s up to the mid-1990s. These authors present a critical reading of the design professions and offer an alternative urban design agenda focused on vital and lively places. The authors in Part Three provide a range of urban design rationales and strategies for reinforcing local physical identity and the creation of memorable places. These selections are largely describing the outcomes of mid-century urban design and voicing concerns over the placeless quality of contemporary urbanism. The fourth part of the Reader explores key issues in urban design and development. Ideas about sprawl, density, community health, public space and everyday life are the primary focus here. Several new selections in this part of the book also highlight important international development trends in the Middle East and China. Part Five presents environmental challenges faced by the built environment professions today, including recent material on landscape urbanism, sustainability, and urban resiliency. The final part examines professional practice and current debates in the field: where urban designers work, what they do, their roles, their fields of knowledge and their educational development. The section concludes with several position pieces and debates on the future of urban design practice.

This book provides an essential resource for students and practitioners of urban design, drawing together important but widely dispersed writings. Part and section introductions are provided to assist readers in understanding the context of the material, summary messages, impacts of the writing, and how they fit into the larger picture of the urban design field.

part |2 pages

PART ONE: HISTORICAL PRECEDENTS IN URBAN DESIGN

chapter |2 pages

Introduction to Part One

chapter |8 pages

“Upsurge of the Renaissance”

ByEdmund N. Bacon

chapter |11 pages

“The Family of Eyes” and “The Mire of the Macadam”

ByMarshall Berman

chapter |9 pages

“Public Parks and the Enlargement of Towns”

ByFrederick Law Olmsted

chapter |9 pages

“Author’s Introduction” and “The Town–Country Magnet”

ByEbenezer Howard

chapter |16 pages

“Ideology and Aesthetics”

ByWilliam H. Wilson

chapter |12 pages

“The Neighborhood Unit”

ByClarence Perry

part |2 pages

PART TWO: FOUNDATIONS OF THE FIELD

chapter |3 pages

Introduction to Part Two

chapter |12 pages

“Josep Lluís Sert’s Urban Design Legacy”

ByRichard Marshall

chapter |7 pages

“Introduction to The Concise Townscape”

ByGordon Cullen

chapter |15 pages

“A City is Not a Tree”

ByChristopher Alexander

chapter |11 pages

“The Significance of A&P Parking Lots, or Learning from Las Vegas”

ByRobert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown

chapter |20 pages

“Collage City”

ByColin Rowe, Fred Koetter

chapter |4 pages

“Conclusion: Great Streets and City Planning”

ByAllan B. Jacobs

chapter |11 pages

“Toward an Urban Design Manifesto”

ByAllan B. Jacobs, Donald Appleyard

chapter |6 pages

“Dimensions of Performance”

ByKevin Lynch

chapter |24 pages

“A Catholic Approach to Organizing What Urban Designers Should Know”

ByAnne Vernez Moudon

part |2 pages

PART THREE: GROWTH OF A PLACE AGENDA

chapter |5 pages

Introduction to Part Three

chapter |6 pages

“Prospects for Places”

ByEdward Relph

chapter |13 pages

“The Phenomenon of Place”

ByChristian Norberg-Schulz

chapter |11 pages

“The Problem of Place in America”

ByRay Oldenburg

chapter |11 pages

“Critical Regionalism: An Architecture of Place”

ByDouglas S. Kelbaugh

chapter |4 pages

“Charter of the New Urbanism”

chapter |12 pages

“Themes of Postmodern Urbanism”

ByNan Ellin

chapter |15 pages

“The Generic City” and “Whatever Happened to Urbanism?”

ByRem Koolhaas

part |2 pages

PART FOUR: DESIGN ISSUES IN URBAN DEVELOPMENT

chapter |3 pages

Introduction to Part Four

chapter |21 pages

“What is Sprawl?”

ByOliver Gillham

chapter |28 pages

“Introduction,” “Physical Activity and Public Health,” and “Urban Design Characteristics”

ByLawrence D. Frank, Peter O. Engelke, Thomas L. Schmid

chapter |16 pages

“Profit and Place”

ByIan Bentley

chapter |18 pages

“The Urbanism of Ambition” and “China Reinvents the City”

ByThomas J. Campanella

part |2 pages

PART FIVE: ADDRESSING ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES

chapter |2 pages

Introduction to Part Five

chapter |6 pages

“An Ecological Method for Landscape Architecture”

ByIan McHarg

chapter |9 pages

“Principles for Regional Design”

ByMichael Hough

chapter |10 pages

“Landscape as Urbanism”

ByCharles Waldheim

chapter |12 pages

“Urban Resilience: Cities of Fear and Hope”

ByPeter Newman, Timothy Beatley, Heather Boyer

part |2 pages

PART SIX: URBAN DESIGN PRACTICE NOW AND TOMORROW

chapter |2 pages

Introduction to Part Six

chapter |10 pages

“Where and How Does Urban Design Happen?”

ByAlex Krieger

chapter |6 pages

“Designing the Urban Design Studio”

ByElizabeth Macdonald

chapter |17 pages

“Design Guidelines in American Cities: Conclusions”

ByJohn Punter

chapter |17 pages

“The End(s) of Urban Design”

ByMichael Sorkin

chapter |6 pages

“A Third Way for Urban Design”

ByKenneth Greenberg

chapter |2 pages

Epilogue

chapter |2 pages

Illustration credits

chapter |2 pages

Editorial credits

chapter |6 pages

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