ABSTRACT

Fifty years ago medicine was straightforward. Doctors had limited therapeutic options and patients did as they were told. Today, an array of medial interventions is putting increasing pressure on limited resources, patients are questioning everything and doctors are uncertain of their role. Health economists hoped to offer important insights to aid decision making, but their technical frameworks bore little resemblance to the practical requirements of end users. Now, this book presents the concepts and insights that health economics has to offer in a way that is accessible to every healthcare decision maker. Getting Health Economics into Practice is for all those who are involved in the planning, commissioning and delivery of healthcare. It illuminates the practical value that the concepts and principles of health economics can offer decision makers at all levels. Comprehensive and extensive, it is the first such book to be edited by a clinician rather than a health economist, with contributions from an expert panel of specialists. This approach ensures it is accessible and useful in the everyday work of health professionals. It is relevant for all healthcare sectors, in particular for Primary Care Trusts, and is essential reading for managers, researchers, and especially practitioners.

part |33 pages

Getting to grips with the basics

chapter |8 pages

An introduction to health economics

ByDavid Kernick

chapter |14 pages

Understanding healthcare delivery: the economic contribution

ByAnthony Scott

chapter |10 pages

Using health economics to facilitate decision making: the basics of economic evaluation

ByDavid Kernick, Ruth McDonald

part |51 pages

Aspects of health economics

chapter |6 pages

Measuring the economic burden of illness

ByDavid Kernick

chapter |12 pages

A principal-agent perspective on clinical governance

ByRussell Mannion, Davies Huw

chapter |8 pages

Transaction cost economics

ByRay Robinson

part |48 pages

Aspects of economic evaluation

chapter |13 pages

Costing interventions in healthcare

ByAnn Netten, David Kernick

chapter |16 pages

Measuring the outcomes of a healthcare intervention

ByDavid Kernick

chapter |12 pages

Undertaking economic evaluations

ByDavid Kernick

chapter |6 pages

Using information from economic evaluations

ByDavid Kernick

part |64 pages

Getting economic evaluation into practice

chapter |10 pages

Pharmacoeconomics

ByTom Walley

chapter |14 pages

Economic evaluation and doctor/nurse skill mix

ByDavid Kernick, Anthony Scott

chapter |12 pages

Economic evaluation of shifts in services from secondary to primary care

ByDavid Kernick, Anthony Scott

chapter |8 pages

Applying economic evaluation to complementary and alternative medicine

ByDavid Kernick, Adrian White

chapter |10 pages

Using economic evaluation at grass roots level

ByRuth McDonald, David Kernick

part |60 pages

Health economics and rationing

chapter |10 pages

Healthcare rationing: an introduction

ByDavid Kernick

chapter |12 pages

Making decisions at a national level: a NICE experience?

ByRod Taylor, Rebecca Mears

chapter |16 pages

Obtaining the views of the public: using conjoint analysis studies when eliciting preferences in healthcare

ByMandy Ryan, Shelley Farrar, Caroline Reeves

chapter |10 pages

Making the trade-off between efficiency and equity

ByCharles Normand

chapter |12 pages

Patients’ rights, NHS rationing and the law

ByChristopher Newdick

part |66 pages

Health economics: some perspectives

chapter |8 pages

The philosophical and methodological basis of health economics

ByJoanna Coast

chapter |8 pages

Economic evaluation and general practice

ByDenis Pereira Gray

chapter |8 pages

Thinking it through: a philosophical perspective

ByMartyn Evans

chapter |12 pages

Health economics and insights from complexity theory

ByDavid Kernick

chapter |6 pages

Health economics: continuing imperialism?

ByAlan Maynard

chapter |2 pages

Epilogue

Edited ByDavid Kernick